Saturday, November 18, 2017

Three Tips for running 80s cartoon style games

Earlier today I ran my first game for my daughter in awhile.  Since she is now 12 she tends to play solely with her friends usually at the local library or part of her middle school's D&D club (which she founded I may add).  Unfortunately with Thanksgiving break upon them the two weekly games (Saturday Library group and Thursday school group) were cancelled for various reasons and my daughter and 3 of her friends were left without a DM or a game.

so I stepped in.

What did we play? 



Using Anti-Paladin's Mini-Six system I created a new group of Silver Hawks and after playing the theme song that you all see above went at it.  However, you cannot run an 80s cartoon game without some standards of 80s cartoons.

1.  No one dies, they just go into a coma.

A hero never dies, they just go into a coma.  While not always the case (as proof see the death of Optimus Prime) the heroes never die, they just go into comas until the plot demands they come out of it and need no physical training or recovery time.

2.  Toy tie in

The heroes always get a power-up of some kind that gives them new weapons, powers, etc.  However, a part of this is always a new more bad-ass outfit.

For this I created a table of temporary "tie-in" effects that lasted throughout a single encounter, because as is the case in all 80s cartoons, that shit will only show up once.

3. The Bad Guys are there Own Worst Enemy

Whether it is through evil comrades trying to off one another in the hopes of gaining favor with the big guy who is typically either a coward, limited because of a cosmic off switch (see Mon-Starr or Mum-ra), or grossly incompetent.

For this I rolled a special dice with every bad guy roll (for this I stole from F-Age)  On doubles from the normal dice an effect from equal to the score on the special dice occurred.

  1. Fellow bad guy abandons you (will tell big bad you went down like a coward)
  2. Fellow bad guy sabotages your equipment or somehow inhibits your powers
  3. Overcome by extreme fear you attempt to escape if success you tell the big bad the good numbers were 10x what they actually were
  4. Presses perceived advantage and instead puts self in a worse situation (Heroes gain a morale dice for the next turn)
  5. Pick any combination of the first four that equals 5
  6. Big Bad appears, deems you a failure and kills you on the spot before departing after telling the heroes that they "aren't worth his/her/its time"



Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Adventure Snippet - Glowing Eyes

((posted from the blogger app on my phone so not the greatest.))

Trying to force myself out of my over a year long funk.  I don't expect this one to be my highest quality adventure but, as they say, baby steps.  I expect the full version to be up on patron early next week and public release (if my remaining patrons are good with it) after Thanksgiving.

Background

For the last several weeks the small hamlet of Rowen has been griped in the embrace of a terror it can neither see or hear.  Every night since the Crossings Moon shone red in the winter sky a child of the hamlet has gone missing.  Most recently the twin daughters of the hamlet’s fishmonger, a dwarf named Gwrown Saltheft, have gone missing.  Like the other children no signs of the girls were found and searches into the nearby hills and through the old grave yard to the south of the hamlet have come up short.

Full of anguish for the loss of his daughters, Gwrown, calls in favors owed to him by both the dwarves of the Quiet Hills and the leaders of the Merchant town of Rappen.  For a full forgiveness of debts owed to Gwrown the leaders of the two settlements most find the fishmonger’s daughters or – barring rescue – avenge their deaths and bring him something to remember the girls by.

Possible Hooks

The Tavern Courier – The Leaders of Rappen are very keen on getting their debts forgiven, however, they really don’t want to waste any of their substantial wealth to find the fishmonger’s daughter.  As such the send couriers to the towns, waystations, and thief dens within 20 miles of Rowen to recruit a party of abled body and foolhardy adventurers to look into the manner, promising gold and a small plot of land in return for the proof of the girls’ deaths. 

In truth the Leaders of Rappen do not plan to pay the adventurers at all, and the land offered is currently occupied by a centuries old vampire who is bound to the land of his old holdings.

Rewards – Old vampire ridden manor in the swamps south of Rappen.

An Old Friend’s Dying Request – A member of the group is informed that an old friend and mentor is dying and has a last favor to ask.  The group arrives in Rowen with no knowledge of the missing children or the fishmonger’s deal with the Quiet hills and Rappen.  While carrying out the last request for their friend they discover the plight of the town, and some of the grieving families band together to offer the adventurers what they can for any information on the missing children.

Rewards – 50 Gold, Town Relic (any single +1 magic item)

Taber’s Will – A Priest of the Church of Taber – the hermaphroditic deity of innocence – comes to the adventurers on the request of her deity.  Many innocent voices in the area of Rowen have gone forever silent and more will soon fall silent.  The adventurers are tasked with rooting out this evil and to increase the favor of Taber in the area.

Rewards – A favor owed to the party by Taber

Stopping the Expansion – The Hill Dwarves of the Quiet Hills have heard Gwrown’s request and have decided that they not only will accept the terms but annex Rowen as well since it is very obviously not a safe place.  A few citizens of the Quiet Hills believe that this will be the downfall of their quiet kingdom and secretly hire the adventurers to find Gwrown’s daughters – or proof of their death and the death of their killer – and bring the proof to them and Gwrown before the Hill Dwarves make it to town and annex it possibly starting a boarder conflict with Rappen.

Rewards – A Map to an old dwarven stronghold that was abandoned eons ago for unknown reasons.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Question for the Gallery

Up front information, this is a topic I've been discussing with my wife for a while and find that she is highly supportive of the concept that I am about to share, however, she has the same concerns about it that I do on the topic.

Okay, with that out of the way lets get to the background and meat of the topic at hand. I have been approached by a number of people locally to attempt to create a Titansgrave or Force Grey style web show for Swords & Wizardry / General OSR style gameplay.  This is, to me, a great idea as both shows have gone a long way to broadening the player base and the understanding of their respective systems (Fantasy*Age and D&D 5e respectively).

The big problem is that while I have been approached by people who think this is a great idea those people are not Frog God Games, or anyone with media knowledge or savvy.  In other words these are random blokes who have either seen me DM or have heard about my DMing.  This presents a pretty big issue to the concept, unlike Geek and Sundry or the Nerdist I have no budget and no ability to create or support such a show.  In other words, It would be a webcam pointed at my kitchen table if I were to attempt this.

So that brings us to the "Question for the Gallery" as the post header exclaims.  Should I move forward with this and does anyone have any ideas (outside of Kickstarter) to get something like this off the ground?  Further question, should I even try I mean, the talents behind the two examples are professionals with acting careers and facial recognition ... me?  I'm just some schlub from Yuengling Town.